JavaScript must be enabled in order for you to use Google Maps. However, it seems JavaScript is either disabled or not supported by your browser. To view Google Maps, enable JavaScript by changing your browser options, and then try again.

Historic Sites

"Pinkworo" (Rocks of Fear) rocks from which slaves drank, grinding stones and indents in the rocks, where slaves ground cereals for food "Pinkworo" (Rocks of Fear) rocks from which slaves drank, grinding stones and indents in the rocks, where slaves ground cereals for food
"Pinkworo" (Rocks of Fear) rocks from which slaves drank, grinding stones and indents in the rocks, where slaves ground cereals for food

Paga Nania Slave Camp

Three kilomteters west of Paga is the suburban village called "Paga Nania". In this village are a slave transit camp and relics of the slave trade. Founded by a brave hunter and farmer, Nania developed into a trading center for Hausa, Mossi and Zambrama traders. From the 16th century when slaves became a dominant item of trade, Nania became the first stopover and auction market for slaves captured in Mossi and surrounding lands. It is the main site on the Upper East slave route. Slaves bought in Nania were sent, by the intermediaries for resale in the Salaga market.

The market was situated in a rocky area referred to as "Pinkworo" (Rocks of Fear). What survives today is a rock outcrop that was used as an observation post by the raiders, water troughs formed in the rocks from which slaves drank, grinding stones and indents in the rocks, where slaves ground cereals for food.

Also on the "Pinkworo" are markings said to have resulted from the slapping of hands and foot stamping by agonized slaves. Another tradition is that slaves used stones to make music on the rocks, which left those marks. Ironically, the heartless slave raiders were said to have enjoyed this as entertainment and music.


Map only shows points of interest within a few kilometers of Paga Nania Slave Camp.
ShopGlobalMamas.org